Photo: Here is a picture I took of one of the worshipers on the edge of the lava lake dancing barefoot on rough lava rock super-heated by the sun to honor Pele, the Volcano goddess. Credit: Seana Fenner

The Summoners of Rain…

Here is a picture I took of one of the worshipers on the edge of the lava lake, dancing barefoot on rough lava rock, super-heated by the sun. She honors Pele, the Volcano goddess. Photo Credit: Seana Fenner
Here is a picture I took of one of the worshipers on the edge of the lava lake, dancing barefoot on rough lava rock, super-heated by the sun. She honors Pele, the Volcano goddess. Photo Credit: Seana Fenner

Odinists are pantheists and we believe in spirit, or as the Hawaiians would say, “mana“, in Nature.. This devotee worships Pele, the fiery Earth Goddess in her dance. The Hawaiian religion is part of a Stone Age culture which has drawn upon remembrance of Asian cultures, ultimately derived from our most ancient traditions,  so there is a relation to our religion.

Offerings near Hale'mau-mau, with the heated air, the breath of Pele, rising from the hot stone.
Offerings near Hale’mau-mau, with the heated air, the “Breath of Pele“, rising from the hot stone.

Here is an excerpt about ancient European rain making from one of my articles, (Sacred Trees and Pagan Plants survive in Medieval English Gardens ).

A Roman writer tells us that in former days, noble matrons used to go with bare feet, streaming hair, and pure minds, up the long Capitoline slope, praying to Jupiter for rain, and straightway, it rained bucketsful, then or never, and everybody returned dripping like drowned rats, but nowadays we are no longer religious, so the fields lie baking.

 

The molten cauldron of Pele's lava lake set against the Milky Way.
The molten cauldron of Pele’s lava lake set against the Milky Way.

Is there something to the idea that the combined wishes and spiritual energy of a people who believe in themselves can affect reality? Personally, I believe so.

This video tells of a similar tradition surviving in Hawai`i.

 

 

 

© Seana Fenner 2018